Teacher Training Institute 2016

Creative Tension & Transformational Learning

July 11-13, 2016
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Avivo Teaching Artists: Patricia Plude & Leo Wanenchak

On July 11, a community of imaginative musicians from all over the midwest and west gathered on the beautiful campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Using a playful, interactive approach we explored creative tension as a catalyst for transformational learning.

In preparation, we read together the chapter entitled “The Hidden Wholeness Paradox in Teaching and Learning” from Parker Palmer’s classic text, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life.

Our workshop comprised more than thirteen hours of invigorating work, including Creative Activities sessions in Musicianship, Rhythms, and Dalcroze Eurhythmics, a multi-part Choral Experience, and several lively Pedagogy Roundtables.

Our time together included artful music improvisation, playful movement, inspired conversation, and insightful sharing.

What Our Participants Are Saying

“One of the larger take-aways from this workshop for me was the discussion of finding the balance between the individual and the group. Philosophically, I see this ever present in my life and the questions I ask about my role in society. It will also impact how I balance group vs individual work in the classroom.”
 
“Wow, this workshop was awesome! The way of discover, drill, and create I will use whenever I can, and the activities I did, I will try with my students.”
 
“I loved being in an environment that involved musicians with various levels of understandings and slightly different interests, yet all having the willingness to participate and support one another so eagerly.”
 
“I found the workshop rejuvenating! It is always great to get together with other music teachers and share ideas and frustrations. We were fortunate to have two very inspiring instructors who shared so many wonderful ideas with us in only a few sessions.”
 
“Pat, you have such a holistic approach to everything you teach. I enjoy the connections you make to the “bigger stories”and how you acknowledge that you are also a student. I respect how humble you are and how open you are to learning from the people you teach. I also appreciate how intently you listen and the extent of your expertise in music and many other things.”
 
“Leo, you make everything fun, and I learn, too! Thank you for explaining the pedagogy for teaching rhythm exercises and solfege. You keep me interested and challenged! And I so appreciate the addition of understanding how vocals work anatomically – very insightful!”